Former Ohio State linebacker Andrew Sweat said he decided to halt his pursuit of an NFL career after he suffered a reoccurrence of concussion symptoms last week.

Former Ohio State linebacker Andrew Sweat said he decided to halt his pursuit of an NFL career after he suffered a reoccurrence of concussion symptoms last week.

Sweat said he didn't "feel right" a couple of hours after bumping his head on a wall as he stepped out of the shower at the Cleveland Browns' team hotel in Middleburg Heights.

"It was a tough decision for me, but in a sense, it wasn't that tough," Sweat said yesterday.

Sweat sustained a concussion last fall before the Purdue game, which he said was the third of his college career. He was cleared to play against Michigan, but didn't after suffering a dislocated elbow in practice. It's something Sweat now believes might have been a blessing in disguise. He passed medical tests and played in the Gator Bowl loss to Florida.

Before the draft, Sweat said he was eager to pursue his dream of playing pro football and believed he had a good chance to be drafted. He wasn't, and signed as a free agent with the Browns.

Meanwhile, the Browns cut running back Armond Smith and signed linebacker Emmanuel Acho, one of their 11 draft picks.

Acho's signing leaves running back Trent Richardson and quarterback Brandon Weeden as the only unsigned rookies.

Hearing on bounty penalties scheduled

The NFL players union's grievance against the league in the New Orleans Saints bounties scandal will be heard on Wednesday.

The union claims that commissioner Roger Goodell doesn't have the authority to hand out discipline for player conduct that occurred before the current collective bargaining agreement was finalized last August. The players argue that a CBA arbitrator has the right to decide player punishment under such circumstances, as well as rule on any appeals.

Arbitrator Shyam Das will hear the case. Das was fired as the permanent arbitrator for baseball yesterday, but that does not affect his status with the NFL and the union.

Rams, St. Louis far apart on dome improvements

The St. Louis Rams and the public entity that operates the Edward Jones Dome are far apart in their plans on how to improve the facility.

While St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay is urging rejection of the Rams' plan, his top aide said it is too soon to sound the alarm that the city might lose an NFL team for the second time since 1987.

The city plan called for $124 million in upgrades, 52 percent of which would be paid for by the Rams. The team's plan called for an overhaul estimated by the city to cost more than $700 million, and it wasn't clear how it would be funded.

The 30-year lease signed when the Rams arrived from Los Angeles prior to the 1995 season requires that the dome remain among the top eight of the 31 NFL stadiums or the team can break the lease after the 2014 season.