Businessman Ted Sarniak, a confidant of former Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor and one of the figures who came to light during the NCAA investigation of Ohio State football in 2011, died in a Greensburg, Pa., hospital on Friday. He was 68.

Businessman Ted Sarniak, a confidant of former Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor and one of the figures who came to light during the NCAA investigation of Ohio State football in 2011, died in a Greensburg, Pa., hospital on Friday. He was 68.

The Dispatch learned in late March 2011 that Sarniak was the man to whom Jim Tressel forwarded controversial emails from a Columbus attorney that laid out details about Pryor and several other players trading memorabilia for cash and other considerations from a local tattoo parlor owner being investigated by federal authorities.

Tressel failed to forward those emails to his OSU superiors, who demanded his resignation on May 30, 2011.

Sarniak never granted any substantial interview with the media regarding his relationship with Pryor, who rose to fame as an all-star quarterback in Jeannette, Pa. Sarniak was the owner of a highly successful specialty glass company in Jeannette and "supported any and all organizations that involved the city," according to his obituary in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Sarniak's cause of death was not listed.

• Michigan wide receiver Darryl Stonum announced he is transferring to Baylor.

Stonum, who has one year of eligibility left, missed last season because of disciplinary issues.

Baylor has yet to confirm his transfer.

The Stafford, Texas, native was dismissed from the Wolverines team prior to last season after his second drunken-driving arrest and a probation violation.

Stonum had 76 career receptions for 1,008 yards and six touchdowns at Michigan. He broke the school's season record for kickoff-return yardage in 2009 with 1,001.

• Jim Carlen, who coached Heisman Trophy winner George Rogers at South Carolina, died in Columbia, S.C. He was 79.

Carlen also coached at West Virginia and Texas Tech. He was 107-69-6 in his 16-year career, had just three losing seasons and led his teams to eight bowl games.