Safety Tyvis Powell found himself elected to office late last week, established as one of Ohio State's six captains, and the personable junior did it without making one campaign speech.

Safety Tyvis Powell found himself elected to office late last week, established as one of Ohio State's six captains, and the personable junior did it without making one campaign speech.

"That was one of those things that you dream about as a kid, but I never really thought would actually happen," Powell said. "But now that it has it's like, wow, to have that much respect by my peers that they want me to be a leader of this team, it's just an honor. I don't want to do anything to let them down."

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Don't expect that to mean his outgoing personality will change. He hinted that was probably the secret of his successful noncampaign.

"I try to stay true to myself and still try to be the same person … whatever my title may be," Powell said. "But I think that, me keeping everybody loose and being the guy that I am and being so down to earth as well, allows people to be able to relate to me."

He tried to go with a new persona for the several weeks.

"But it just really wasn't working for me," Powell said, his voice rising to high pitch. "So I've just got to stay true to myself."

Speaking of captains

Among the two players competing to start at quarterback, sophomore J.T. Barrett was elected a captain while junior Cardale Jones was not. Even though that is a plus in Barrett's column, coach Urban Meyer said that ultimately the starting job will be won by the player who best moves the offense.

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Still, Barrett has struck a chord with some of his teammates, such as receiver Michael Thomas. But Thomas said that doesn't mean he's picking a side.

"J.T., he's a leader, he's real vocal," Thomas said. "I feel like he has great parents that brought him up like that, so he's someone we just trust. And when we're in a situation, he will always speak up, he always voices his opinion."

Losing Brown a blow

Offensive coordinator Ed Warinner not only had big plans for Noah Brown on the field, he also had a personal connection. He was the lead recruiter for the receiver two years ago.

To see Brown suffer a broken leg last week, "a guy that you bring here and you have to tell his mom that he went down, that's hard," Warinner said. "But they're great people, great family, and we'll look forward to having Noah back with us when he heals up."

tmay@dispatch.com

@TIM_MAYsports

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