Three teams that need no introduction. One from out of nowhere.

Though the 2018 NCAA Tournament produced the biggest upset in the history of the event along with a seemingly endless string of wild finishes and unexpected results, the Final Four will look very much like it has over the last handful of seasons.

In one of next Saturday's semifinals, it's a barnburner of a matchup between top-seeded programs with rich histories: Villanova vs. Kansas.

In what will quickly become known as the "other" semifinal, it's an upstart vs. another school that knows this road: No. 11 Loyola-Chicago vs. No. 3 Michigan.

Remarkable as Loyola's run has been, this marks the fifth time over the past six seasons that three teams seeded 1 through 4 have been joined by another seeded 7 or higher.

The four previous times, the underdog has bowed out in the semifinal.

"Why not us?" Ramblers coach Porter Moses said, repeating his team's oft-used mantra this month — one he hopes can lead to yet another history making upset. "You have to have high-character guys that believe to truly do that."

The teams will have trouble topping the show Kansas and Duke put on Sunday with the last spot in San Antonio up for grabs. The Jayhawks topped the Blue Devils 85-81 in overtime to send Kansas back to the site of its last national title, in 2008.

The winner between No. 1 seeds Kansas and Villanova will almost certainly be favored in the final. This year's most-notable underdog — outside of Maryland-Baltimore County, which beat Virginia in the tournament's first week to pull off the first 16 vs. 1 upset — is Loyola-Chicago.

A look at some of the history behind these Final Four teams:

LOYOLA-CHICAGO: This program won the title in 1963 in one of the most significant championship runs in the sport's history — including a game known as the "Game of Change." The Ramblers, with a mostly black roster, defeated an all-white team from Mississippi State, which served as prelude to the better-known title game in which Texas Western and its all-black starting lineup defeated Kentucky. Loyola went on to beat Cincinnati in overtime for the title.

MICHIGAN: All the freshmen dominating today's game should pay homage to the Fab Five — the group of five freshmen, including Jalen Rose and Chris Webber, who made baggy shorts the rage and took the Wolverines to the Final Four in 1992. This year's Wolverines were a middle-of-the-pack Big Ten team in early February, after a loss at Northwestern dropped them to 8-5 in the conference. They haven't lost since, and their 13-game winning streak is second in the country only to the Ramblers, who have won 14 straight.

VILLANOVA: Juniors Jalen Brunson and Mikal Bridges were there for Villanova's national title two years ago. They are the team's leading scorers. The Wildcats haven't been seriously pushed yet in the tournament, winning every game by double digits.

KANSAS: Since winning it all in 2008, the Jayhawks had been seeded No. 1 five times and failed to make the Final Four any of those times. But Malik Newman scored all 13 of Kansas' points in overtime to help the Jayhawks top Duke and end that slide. "There's a lot of players out there who deserve the best of the best," Jayhawks coach Bill Self said. "They get to experience the very best there is. I'm happy for them."